You Can Research Your Home

If you live in an older home in South Australia you may be able to find out about it by following the tips from the State Library and State Records of South Australia, you don’t need to be a historian to find things out.

You will be surprised by what you can find out about the home you live in.

The State Library has a downloadable guide for Researching your locality in the collections of the State Library of South Australia which covers

Almanacs and directories
• Architecture in South Australia
• Mapping sources for South Australian history
• South Australian newspapers

as well as Tracing the History of a House

State Records has House or Property History which takes you through how to use their Archives Search, the South Australian Integrated Land Information System (SAILIS), Location SA, Maps of the Surveyor General’s Office, 1808-1946, land tax assessment returns and more.

Find Records For Government Childrens’ Homes in South Australia

Find Records For Government Childrens’ Homes in South Australia

I recently found a listing of state government childrens’ homes in South Australia. Here are all the named homes. Searching Google for any of these names will help you find pictures and info about them. Below the list are links to help with finding records.

Bedford Park Boys Training Centre
Boys Reformatory Hulk, Fitzjames
Boys Reformatory, Magill
Brookway Park
Campbell House Farm School, Meningie
Central Depot
Destitute Asylum

Photograph Campbell House Farm School
Campbell House Farm School

Edwardstown Industrial School
Girls Reformatory, Edwardstown
Girls Reformatory, Magill
Glandore Industrial School/Children’s Home
Grace Darling Hotel
Ilfracombe, Boys Reformatory
Lochiel Park Boys Training Centre
Magill Industrial School
McNally Training Centre
Redruth Girls Reformatory
Seaforth Home
South Australian Youth Remand and Assessment Centre
South Australian Youth Training Centre
Struan Farm School, Naracoorte
Vaughan House
Windana Remand Home

Allambi Girls Hostel


Allambi Girls Hostel
Davenport House
Kumanka Boys Hostel
Luprina Hostel
Nindee Hostel
Stuart House Boys Hostel
Woorabinda Hostel (and Campsite)
Cottage Homes
Clark Cottage, Clarence Park
Colton Cottage, Thorngate
Dartmouth Family Home, Port Augusta
Family Home, Mount Gambier
Fullarton Cottage, Myrtle Bank
Glandore Family Home
Hay Cottage, Lockleys
Kandarik Cottage
Klemzig Family Home
Largs Bay Cottage Home
Malvern Cottage
Merrilama Cottage, Glenelg
Morada Cottage
Port Lincoln Family Home
Port Pirie Cottage/Family Home
Pybus Family Home, Port Augusta
Reception Cottage, Glandore/Somerton Park
Slade Cottage, Glandore/Somerton Park
Spence Cottage, Kensington Gardens
Stirling Cottage, St Peters
Tintoo Cottage
Unit Living, Marion

This document Government Institutions South Australia gives a description, the history and where to find records for each institution listed above. If you had an ancestor who spent time in one of these homes you may be able to find them in the records.

There is more information here at Care Leavers Australasia Network https://clan.org.au/

Find and Connect A resource for Forgotten Australians, Former Child Migrants and anyone interested in the history of child welfare in Australia.

How Did Leo Buring Get A Mention In A Mickey Mouse Cartoon?

How Did Leo Buring Get A Mention In A Mickey Mouse Cartoon?

My first cousin 3x removed Hermann Paul Leopold Buring, known simply as Leo Buring, is pictured below with Walt Disney. Leo is much better known for his wine making than he is for knowing Walt Disney and gifting him a pair of wallabies in 1934.

This was new information to my Mum, whether my Grandmother knew or not we don’t know, she never mentioned it. She would have been 17 at the time.

This is the passenger list for the S.S. Mariposa, Leo is the last person on the list. He is travelling from Sydney, Australia to the United States.

Left to right Walt Disney and Leo Buring, photo from Twitter https://twitter.com/OzKitsch/status/1092684150719442945

The Adelaide Advertiser reported on the gift. 1934 ‘OUR COUNTRY SECTION’, The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 – 1954), 19 November, p. 13. , viewed 17 Aug 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35019767
1934 ‘Out among the People’, The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 – 1954), 20 November, p. 17. , viewed 17 Aug 2021, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article35019980

The following year 1935 Walt names Leo in a short cartoon named Mickey’s Kangaroo.

Mickey’s Kangaroo

If you don’t know who Leo Buring was, here is a fairly good article https://www.bestwinesunder20.com.au/leo-buring-way-ahead-of-his-time/ There is just one error that I know of which I left them a comment about.

Shipwreck Survivor, Ellen Mary Chamberlain, An Incredible Woman – Part One

This post was first published in December 2010.  I have updated and republished it as part of Women’s History Month.

I am amazed by the things Ellen went through in her life.  Born in Westminster, Middlesex, England in 1833 Ellen had five siblings.  It is believed she came to South Australia in 1848 on the Princess Royal, when she was just fifteen, with her sister Eliza Isabella Chamberlain.  Their parents had come out three years earlier.  I can’t imagine travelling on a sailing ship to a new country, basically alone, at fifteen years of age.

Port Adelaide 1840s

On the 2nd Aug 1850, at seventeen years of age, Ellen married Captain James Welsh at St Andrew’s church in Walkerville, Adelaide, South Australia.

On the 4th Sep 1850 Ellen was on board her husband James’ ship the Harlequin travelling to Singapore when they were struck by a violent northwest gale.  The ship was lost along with three of the crew.

The Harlequin was owned by Elder and Co. of Adelaide, departing that port for Singapore on 3 August 1850 under the command of Captain Welsh (or Welch) with a crew of eight, and was to call at Albany and Fremantle en route. The captain’s wife of one month was also on board. A newspaper criticised the condition of the rigging of the schooner stating that ‘she was most shamefully found in every respect, and had hardly a whole rope from stem to stern’ (Gazette, 27 September 1850: 2c). Western Australian Museum Shipwreck Database

The gale then swung to the south-west, and at 3 o’clock in the morning of 4 September the Harlequin was driven on to the coast to the west of West Cape Howe, ‘a locality of the most fearful description for such a mishap, the coast consisting of almost perpendicular rocks of granite, near 200 feet high, and the water at the base having a depth of ten fathoms’ (Gazette, 20 September 1850: 2c). The vessel very quickly began to go to pieces, and three of the crew, the cook, a seaman and a cabin boy, were drowned. It was later stated that the seaman was drunk and made no effort to save himself. Mrs Welsh was three times washed off a spar that the crew were using to help get her ashore. On each occasion she ‘regained it by swimming, an art of which she was before entirely ignorant! and only knew by description’ (ibid.).
The cook attempted to save his life by grasping at the dress of Mrs Welsh, who had gained a small rock; and as his efforts threatened the loss of her life, and could not save his own, his hold was broken off by one of the sailors, and he sank (Inquirer, 18 September 1850: 2c).

Mrs Welsh had been asleep below, and was dressed only in a night dress. The body of the drowned sailor was located on a ledge of rock, so his trousers were removed and given to her to wear. The survivors were saved by a sailor climbing the cliff with a rope, which, after fastening one end, he lowered to the others. This enabled them to climb the rocks, and finally Mrs Welsh was hauled up. Western Australian Museum Shipwreck Database

A full description of the ship, its cargo, passengers and the rescue of Mrs Welsh (Ellen Mary) can be found in the Western Australian Museum Shipwreck Database.

Back In South Australia

Ellen and James’ first child, William George Welsh was born in Pine Forest, South Australia on 7 Sep 1851.  The family then moved to Victoria and another son was born in 1853, Charles James Welsh.  Sadly Charles only lived for eight weeks.  Ellen was far away from her own family back in Adelaide, I often wonder how she coped being away from home, with a young toddler and mourning the loss of her second child.

 Geelong Harbour 1857

In 1855 Ellen and James are recorded as living in Geelong, Victoria where James had the position of Bar Pilot for the port.

A bar pilot or maritime pilot is a professional who helps to guide ships through navigationally challenging waters. While the bar pilot is on board, he or she provides advice to the captain; this advice is based on knowledge of local waters, weather conditions, and the abilities of the captain’s boat. Typically, the captain retains legal control and responsibility of the ship, although a bar pilot can be held accountable for egregious navigational errors which result in substantial damages.  (Thanks to wisegeek.com for this info.)

Ellen’s parents and her younger sister Eliza Isabella arrived in Geelong for a visit before returning to England.

This article from the Geelong Advertiser is titled “Melancholy And Fatal Accident”.  Eliza Isabella Chamberlain, Ellen’s sister, was killed by falling timber near the Harbour Master’s office on the 7th Mar 1855.  The full article with the inquest details are on Trove.

I don’t know how long the Welshs remained in Geelong, the next record I have is of the birth of their daughter Eleanor Isabella Welsh, my great, great grandmother, in 1857 in Melbourne, Victoria.  I didn’t realise until I was writing this post that Eleanor Isabella would have been named after Ellen’s sister.

Eleanor Isabella Chapman nee Welsh
Back in Adelaide in 1860 and another daughter is born to Ellen and James.  Clara Elizabeth Welsh is born on the 22nd Aug 1860 in Queenstown, Adelaide, South Australia.

Special thanks to Joanne Steele for all her research and for the photo of Eleanor Isabella Welsh.

Stay tuned for part two of this amazing lady’s story.

GEDCOM X A New Standard?

GEDCOM X.

The GEDCOM X project is FamilySearch‘s offering to the community of a set of free and open specifications, libraries, and tools defining how genealogical data can be stored, shared, searched, and secured across all phases of the genealogical research process.

This is a new and exciting development in the genealogical community.  At present it is difficult to export and import a .gedcom file from one program to another without some data loss and errors, hopefully .gedcomx will be able to address these and other issues.

I will be excitedly following the project and hope to be able to contribute to it a little as well.

 

.gedcomx model

.gedcomx model

If you scroll about half way down this page https://github.com/FamilySearch/gedcomx/wiki there is more explanation of what the .gedcomx will cover.

The intent of GEDCOM X is to define a standard for modeling and exchanging the components of the research process that comprise the genealogical proof standard:

  • Search Reliable Sources
  • Cite Each Source
  • Analyze Sources, Information, and Evidence
  • Resolve Conflicts
  • Make a Soundly-Reasoned Conclusion

 

Unexpected Genealogy

This is a bonus blog post today.  It’s a coincidental thing which happened so it definitely wasn’t on my editorial calendar but I’m very happy to ditch the blog schedule when this happens!!

I went to the Fleece and Fibre Fair in Mt Pleasant (South Australia)

today to buy more lovely yarn and wool roving for my textile art.  I already have photographs of ancestor’s graves from the nearby Mt Torrens cemetery so I wasn’t thinking genealogy when I left home.

 

Mt Pleasant Soldiers Memorial Hall

Fleece & Fibre Fair

The merchants selling their lovely wares.

In a little side room off the main hall I found these honour rolls and soldiers’ photos.

Frank Henry Hicks

Frank Henry Hicks my first cousin once removed, who died on 10 October 1918, Israel.

There is more information about Frank on my family tree website.

Has this sort of unexpected genealogy happened to anyone else?  Please share your stories in the comments as we’d all like to hear about them.

Mt Pleasant District Honour Roll

Mt Pleasant District Honour Roll

The Great War - In the front line trenches

 In The Front Line Trenches

 

Mt Pleasant District Honour Roll

Those who paid the supreme sacrifice.

Man in Viking costume

And I couldn’t help but include a picture of this chap at the Fair in his terrific Viking get up!!

For my next post I’ll try and get back on schedule!! 🙂