Young Sea Dog Seeking Adventure – Trove Tuesday

I searched Trove for the words Buring tobacconist (my 2x great grandfather Heinrich Franz Rudolph Buring was a tobacconist in Adelaide, South Australia) to see what I might find and the following article resulted.  This is something I never knew about and a totally unexpected result from a search for tobacconists.

[trove newspaper=95799359]

Phillip Rushton Buring is my first cousin twice removed.  I did a Google search on the Lawhill and was surprised to find results including this photo and wikipedia page. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawhill

the four masted barque lawhill

The Barque Lawhill, photo courtesy of the State Library of Victoria

It turns out this is a fairly well known ship.

From the SA Memory website

The Lawhill was one of the many ships involved in the Australian grain trade. Before that she had carried jute and then case oil for the Anglo-American Oil Company before being bought by Gustaf Erikson in 1917. After her first voyage for Erikson to South America he placed the ship in the South Australian grain trade and she continued in this right through the Second World War. However in 1941 she was taken over by the South African government and ended her career in 1947 under the South African Blue Ensign. From this we may assume that the date on the photograph is incorrect.

Lawhill was a steel four masted, bald-headed, stump-topgallant barque, a consistent sailer which earned the name the ‘Lucky Lawhill’; between 1921-39 Lawhill made 14 voyages to the Spencer Gulf with an average sailing time of 121 days.

 

There are terrific pictures of a scale model of the Lawhill on this site http://www.ahailey.f9.co.uk/lawhill.htm

Another Trove article

[trove newspaper=11348226]

I haven’t been able to find Phillip’s apprenticeship records yet or the details of his service on the Lawhill, but I will continue searching.

Phillip Rushton Buring

Phillip Rushton Buring – not sure how old he is in this photo.

I just found this photo which I had forgotten I had.

Phillip and his brother Ralph went into the tobacconist shop following after their father and grandfather.  I’ve also found more articles, with this search, for further Trove Tuesday posts.

5 thoughts on “Young Sea Dog Seeking Adventure – Trove Tuesday

  • April 13, 2013 at 2:18 pm
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    Hi there.

    I have a bible enscribed as follows:

    “Joseph Greenway
    His Holy Bible
    McCullums Creek
    November 11th 1863”

    I believe that McCullums Creek may be a mispelling of McCallums Creek, near Maryborough Victoria. Possibly he is an ancestor of yours. Was about to list the bible on eBay, but thought you might like it. It is in good condition for its age. You can have it for $50.00 if you would like.

    Not sure how else to get in touch with you other than on this page.

    Kind regards

    Nathan

    Reply
    • April 13, 2013 at 3:11 pm
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      Wow Nathan you have totally blown me away. I’ll send you an email now. Thank you so much for contacting me.
      Kylie 🙂

      Reply
  • April 17, 2013 at 2:26 am
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    What a fantastic find Kylie… and great follow up. I was wondering why this story was reported in the “Port Pirie Recorder” about an event in Port Adelaide and then realised that it probably picked up grain from Pirie and maybe Pt Adelaide before heading round Cape Horn to England. Also WONDERFUL to have Nathan contact you re: the Bible… looking forward to a post about that. 🙂

    Reply
    • April 17, 2013 at 6:36 am
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      Apparently the ship Phillip was on was involved in the “grain races” between here and England so yes I think you’re right. The Bible should be arriving any day now and I will definitely be blogging about it!!!

      Reply
      • April 30, 2013 at 11:19 pm
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        Oh… I haven’t heard of the “grain races”… Wonder if my Grandfather may have been involved in them??? mmmhhh

        Reply

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